Archive for the ‘Man Recordings Releases’ Category

Man 096 Omulu + King Doudou “Baile Saboroso EP”

Friday, September 9th, 2016
Man 096 Omulu + King Doudou "Baile Saboroso EP"

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Man Recordings is really hyped to debut the first collaboration between legendary French producer and dembow-don Douster a.k.a. King Doudou with Rio De Janeiro hot ticket, the rasteirinha-bass mestre Omulu. The result is the “Baile Saboroso” EP. Naturally, the “Baile” is related to Baile Funk, and this EP is a trans-atlantic joint-venture that mixes up the best of two continents guaranteed to make culs and bundas move!

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KING DOUDOU

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OMULU

“Baile Saboroso” is a carefully dosed mix of trap and baile funk drums. The menacing melodies and heavy 808s responding to Mc Pedrinho’s Vocals quickly morphes into a 4×4 rumbling club track designed to smash dancefloor from Paris to São Paulo and beyond!

“Bonde Da Pantera” ft. MC Tha brings baile funk to the lounge floor, with the sensual and hot lyrics of upcoming São Paulo vocalist MC Tha. The sweet marimbas chords and vocal chops are giving the track a late summery vibe ideal to listen to while enjoying a last agua de coco on the beach.

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MC THA

One dancefloor smashing club banger, and a sweet, baile funk inspired mid tempo groover – this is the heat of the “Baile Saboroso” EP. Pump It Up!

Listen to it here:

MAN 095 DANIEL HAAKSMAN “AFRICAN FABRICS REMIXES”

Friday, July 29th, 2016
MAN 095 DANIEL HAAKSMAN "AFRICAN FABRICS REMIXES"

Man 095 Artwork

It´s been a bit more than four months since Daniel Haaksman´s “African Fabrics” album has been released and it has become a success story. “African Fabrics” was nominated for a German Music Critic prize, was praised on leading media outlets such as SPIN, NPR, XLR8R, Der Spiegel, NZZ, Songlines Magazine and Goethe Institute Podcast amongst others and has been played by countless club and radio DJs around the world.

The accompanying single releases “Sabado”, “Rename The Streets” and “Akabongi” received remix and video treatments, now the other tracks of the albums have been reworked. The result is “African Fabrics Remixes”, which presents a trans world cast of amazing remixers.

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DANIEL HAAKSMAN

First off is South African Mo Laudi with an Afro house rendering of “Akabongi”. It´s followed by three remixes featuring the hot new Lisbon sound, starting with 2Pekes, a member of the infamous DZC Deejays crew who remixed “Sembène” in Euro kuduro fashion. Izem, also based in Lisbon, put “Kaggua” ft. Tshila on a broken beat turf. Man of the moment Dotorado is featured with his Kuduro house version of “Rename The Streets”. UK´s freestyle bass dons LV revisit “Sabado” with a London carnival mood. Then there´s São Paulo´s hot new beat talent Bad $ista who samba-funked up “Black Coffee” ft. Dama Do Bling. Another Lisbon remix contribution is by legendary Portuguese kuduro don DJ NK remaking “Xinguila” ft. Throes + The Shine in a raved up kuduro smasher. Swedish bass maestro Dance, Kill, Move tamed the original footwork monster “Aho” to a tarraxo influenced half timer. Probably the heaviest remix on “African Fabrics Remixes” is by São Paulo´s ambassador of low end schlepp beats, Cybass, who put “Afrika” ft. Tony Amado ft. Alcinda Gueraneh into madness territories. Durban´s Gqom kingpins Rudeboyz added a weighty groove to the Mbira infused “Raindrops” track, turning it into a club ready track. And finally, New Zealands Afro popster Weird Together remade “Querido” ft. Bulldozer with a UK funky inspired mood.

And there you have it, “African Fabrics Remixes”, featuring eleven diverse and club-friendly remixes that will put “African Fabrics” in further and more varied contexts. Play it out!

Man 094 Sants “Flex EP”

Friday, July 1st, 2016
Man 094 Sants "Flex EP"

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Man Recordings is very proud to present the “Flex EP” by São Paulo DJ and producer Sants. Along with other names such as NeguimBeats, Psilosamples, Cybass, Tropkillaz, Bad $ista and Omulu, 22 year-old Sants is at the forefront of the new Brazilian beats and bass music scene. In this ambient diverse world of new music and no genre tags, Sants is well known for his distinct ability to digest a wide array of foreign influences and reinterpret them through the harsh lens of the Brazilian scenario, while still entrancing the ever-fickle tastes of the online music community.

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SANTS

“Noite Ilustrada”, his first full length album, was conceived during the 2013 Red Bull Music Academy Bass Camp in São Paulo. After gorging himself on laid-back Los Angeles beats by day and heavy London bass by night, Sants craved his own cocktail of sound, inspired by the constant bustle of a metropolitan night. With assistance from many of his Beatwise colleagues, he helped to illustrate the cityscapes and night scenarios average of the Sao Paulo nightlife. After recently starring on Mixmag’s compilation tape with Trapdoor, and a consistent EP “Chavoso”, Sants is eager to continue his international collaborations with conviction on his “Flex” EP.

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“Flex” is a common term in Brazil for cars that run both on alcohol and gasoline and this is how he wants his music to work as. After a long period of listening just to trap beats, Sants decided to pull some effort shaping the middle-term of what it would be the interpretation of the Brazilian sound by a Brazilian who is nurturing on a diet of both UK bass and global music every single day. The result is the “Flex” EP, who finds home at Man Recordings, another influence for him. In the Eps five tracks, Sants draws club scenarios and urban scapisms of the suburbs of São Paulo by a view of a person who lives its night every single weekend.

Early DJ support by Gilles Peterson, Switch, Branko, Feadz, Munchi, DJ Orgasmic (Sound Pellegrino), Viní, So Shifty and many others!

Follow Sants on Facebook @Santsbeats

Listen to it it from below and buy it from Itunes, Beatport, Amazon etc!

MAN 093 Daniel Haaksman “Akabongi” ft. Spoek Mathambo

Friday, May 20th, 2016
MAN 093 Daniel Haaksman "Akabongi" ft. Spoek Mathambo

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“Akabongi” ft. Spoek Mathambo is the opening track of Daniel Haaksman´s acclaimed “African Fabrics” album and since its original release, has become a secret club hit.

Now released as a single including three new versions, “Akabongi” (Zulu for “no gratitude”) is featuring the shining voice of South African superstar Spoek Mathambo. Spoek perfectly reinterpretes the legendary 1980s song by South African mbaqanga heroes The Soul Brothers, adding contemporaneity with a cool freestyle rap . The magnificient guitar play by Colombia´s Bulldozer adds up to a tropical, Zoukous resembling vibe that puts sunshine and joy onto every dancefloor.

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Spoek Mathambo

The original version is supplemented with an extended mix plus a club ready Afro house remix by South Africa´s jack of all trades, Mo Laudi. To round up the tropical feeling, Lithunia´s Boyfriend remade “Akabongi” in dembow fashion.

Play it out loud and make sure that “Akabongi” will become the summer club anthem of 2016!

DJ support by Munchi, Nina Las Vegas, Mumdance, JSTJR, Shir Khan, Mixhell, Ben Mono, Roundtable Knights, Alma Negra and many more!

Buy it from here:

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MAN 092 DANIEL HAAKSMAN “AFRICAN FABRICS” ALBUM

Friday, February 26th, 2016
MAN 092 DANIEL HAAKSMAN "AFRICAN FABRICS" ALBUM

Man 092 Daniel Haaksman "African Fabrics" copy

Alluding the famous Rene? Magritte painting “Ceci n´est pas une pipe” (“This is not a pipe”), the British- Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare declared in 2011: “A picture of a pipe isn´t necessarily a pipe, an image of “African Fabric” isn´t necessarily authentically (and wholly) African”. In his artistic work, in which he drapes African fabrics on Victorian figures, Yinka Shonibare reflects on colonialism and post-colonialism. After all, the colorful, pattern-rich cloths which are commonly referred to as “African Fabrics” and can be found on flea and cloth markets, mostly are not “African” in its origin, but rather artifiacts of a complex political and economical interplay between African, Europa and the world. Called “African Fabrics” or “Dutch Wax” these cloths emenate mostly from Holland, lately from China.

The story of the “African Fabrics” can also be applied to the perception and the image building of music from Africa. Here, one can ask: What kind of sounds are associated with the African continent? How does Africa sound in the 21st century? What´s “African” music in the age of digital media and a frenzied globalization? The Berlin DJ, producer and label owner Daniel Haaksman deals with answers in his album “African Fabrics”. Because many of today´s urban music styles which come via the internet today from Africa to Europe have nothing more to do with what we previously imagined as “African Music”. In 2016 it should be clear: The popular cliché of Nigerian Afrobeat or drumming communities need an urgent update. Africa has long since arrived in the digital age, music videos from Africa with millions of plays on Youtube or tracks with tens of thousands of clicks on SoundCloud are emblematic of the long practiced, local African reinterpretations of global circulating signs of pop culture.

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DANIEL HAAKSMAN

For more than ten years, Daniel Haaksman released urban Sounds from Brasil, his compilations and releases on his label Man Recordings created the genre-term “baile funk”, now used internationally. In 2012, he travelled for a DJ appearance for the first time to Angola and plunged into the world of Kuduro, that specific Angolan high-speed dance style that originated in the late 1980s from hybridization of Euro house, US rap and Angolan semba. On another trip through the former Portuguese speaking colony Mozambique, as well as numerous visits to Lisbon, Daniel encountered various musical concepts for the future that are far from the nostalgic look of pop and club music in Europe, the UK and the US these days.

For the eleven tracks on “African Fabrics” Daniel Haaksman synthesized internet and streeet market finds with current bass music styles of the northern hemisphere. “Ceci n´est past l´Afrique”, as the album is not about the one-on-one mirroring of current sounds from Africa. It´s not about authenticity either. As with the African fabrics from Holland it´s about transcontinental cultural dialogues and their artistic interpretations. The results are fueled by the global resonant space named internet in which genre confuse and new musical artifacts emerge. Yes, on “African Fabrics” we hear afro footwork, minimal marimba house, a two-step bass track paired with a kalimba, or a regional Angolan language mounted on a futurist beat. Haaksman is playing with the characters, literally. The word “Fabrics” in the English language not only means “materials” but also “structures” or “textures” – and Daniel is putting big, colourful splashes of sound onto them.

“African Fabrics” begins with “Akabongi”, a new version of a pop hit by South African group The Soul Brothers which Haaksman recorded with legendary South African rapper Spoek Mathambo in Zulu. “Sembène” pays a bass-heavy Congo funk hommage to Senegalese writer and filmmaker Ousmae Sembène whose films represent a great source of inspiration for Daniel. “Kaggua” ft. Tshila is a rap with Ugandan singer Tshila in the Ugandan Luganda langugae about fun at a party. “Rename The Streets” and the accompanying music video focuses on the colonial history of Germany. The video shows two dancers which transform street signs in Berlin´s “African Quarter” bearing names of questionable colonial figures.

“Sabado” features the great Colombian champeta guitarist Bulldozer, which echoes West African music influences that are still very dominant in todays Colombian music. “Black Coffee” is a track with the Mozambican rapper Dama Do Bling over probably the most popular African plant that is consumed worldwide – coffee! The Portuguese-Angolan kuduro-punk band Throes + The Shine is guest on “Xinguila” and combines the energy of punk with the bass and rap flow of Kuduro music. “Aho” takes the listener to a street choir in Harare (Zimbabwe) and adds a footwork groove from Chicago to it. “Afrika” is an amazing song with the inventor of Angolan high-speed dance genre Kuduro, Tony Amado, and the Mozambican singer Alcindah Guerane that is sung in Kimbunde (a regional Angolan language) about the history of Africa the time of slavery to the present, mounted on a beat that eclipses a production of Timbaland. “Raindrops” is a Berlin electronica interpretation of a Zimbabwean mbira song. And finally, “Querido”, again with Bulldozer on guitar, recapping the transatlantic and global music connections.

The eleven songs of “African Fabrics” are visually illustrated by German artist Tobias Rehberger. For years Rehberger has artistically reflected on the relationship between patterns, sculpture and space. For the cover artwork, Rehberger interpreted patterns of “African Fabrics”, abstracted their colours and shapes, creating a visual counterpart to the musical approach and the fresh new sound of Daniel Haaksman.

Listen to the album here:

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